Archive for the ‘Explore Monterey’ Category

Stroll the Row, Steinbeck Style

Friday, July 5th, 2013
Facebook Twitter Email Pinterest

Most remember John Steinbeck’s classic work of fiction, Cannery Row from required school reading lists. Others, have lost themselves in the pages of the famous novel time and time again as adults. But when it comes to Cannery Row and its sequel, Sweet Thursday, the vivid pictures they paint of historic Cannery Row and the surrounding areas are unforgettable.

Straight from the pages of the classic novel, the historical streets of the Cannery Row area sit just a little over a mile from downtown Monterey and the Portola Hotel & Spa. These streets and alleys are packed full of literary history that both fans of the novel and history in general will enjoy.

There are a number of not to be missed attractions from both Cannery Row and Sweet Thursday that allow visitors to take a walk in Steinbeck’s shoes, experience the breathtaking views of the Monterey Bay and develop a complete understanding of why Steinbeck had such a deep love for the Central Coast.

Steinbeck’s Homes:

Two of Steinbeck’s homes still stand today. The little red cottage Steinbeck shared with his first wife in the 1930’s can be found at 147 11th Street in Pacific Grove. The home is privately owned, but fans can walk or drive by to get a peak of the house from the outside.

The home where Steinbeck, his wife and son lived in 1945, the year Cannery Row was published, is just a short 10 minute walk from the Portola. The Lara-Soto Adobe in Monterey, located at 460 Pierce Street, is now the Admissions Center at the Monterey Institute of International Studies and is only two blocks up from the great food and shopping in historic downtown Monterey.

 Old Fisherman’s Wharf:

Located on the water, across from Historic Custom House Plaza is Old Fishman’s Wharf, which was featured in Steinbeck’s novel Sweet Thursday. During Steinbeck’s time, the wharf was full of immigrant and native California fisherman who caught the abundance of sardines, squid and abalone that flourished in the Monterey Bay during that time. The canning industry that helped to establish the Monterey we know today gives much of the local flavor in both of Steinbeck’s works. Visitors to present day Fisherman’s Wharf  will find it lined with restaurants, whale watching and fishing charters and fun local shops to explore.

Doc’s Lab:

Still standing at 800 Cannery Row and straight from the pages of the novel of the same name is Doc Rickett’s Lab.  Steinbeck and Ed Ricketts, his friend who himself was the inspiration for the character Doc in Cannery Row, were great friends and would together collect marine life in the Monterey Bay and prep it in this facility before shipping it to schools and medical facilities.  Tours of the lab are available on select dates and interested parties can talk to the Portola concierge about availability or contact the Cannery Row Foundation.

 Wing Chong’s Market and La Ida Café:  

Located at across from Doc’s Lab at 835 Cannery Row is the Wing Chong building that was the location of Wing Chong’s Market in Cannery Row. Steinbeck referred to the market in the novel as “not a model of neatness, but a miracle of supply.” Next door to the Wing Chong building is the location of the La Ida Café from Cannery Row where Eddie, the part-time bartender, poured leftover drinks into a jug for Mack and the boys. The La Ida Café is now home to Austino’s Patisserie, where visitors can go to enjoy a cup of coffee and speculate whether the local legends are true about a under ground tunnel connecting Wing Chong’s Market to Austino’s.

Hop in the car, on a bike or put or on those walking shoes and take in the unique experience of being able to view the locations that will continue to live forever frozen in time on the pages of both Cannery Row and Sweet Tuesday.

The Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary, “The Serengeti of the Sea”

Monday, June 3rd, 2013
Facebook Twitter Email Pinterest

 

For locals and visitors alike, the Monterey Bay offers something for everyone. Whether a source of income for local fishermen, recreation for kayakers and scuba divers, a muse for artists or an educational opportunity for students and scientists waters surrounding the Monterey Peninsula are near and dear us all. But who helps to monitor and protect this iconic part of the Central Coast?

The Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary (MBNMS) is 276 miles of coastline and 6094 square miles of ocean stretching from Marin in the north to Cambria in the south. The Sanctuary was established in 1992 by the Federal Government for the purpose of protection, education, public use and research. The area includes one of the United States’ largest kelp forests, one of North America’s underwater canyons which is part of the closest deep ocean to shore ecosystems in the continental U.S. This rich and diverse area which features 33 species of Marine Mammals, 94 species of sea birds and 345 species of fish and countless invertebrates and plants has earned the MBNMS the moniker, “Serengeti of the Sea”.

Visitors to the Sanctuary can experience its beauty in a variety of ways. Organized kayaking, boating, diving and camping are all available to the general public, as are wildlife tours and whale watching. A great way to experience the wonders of the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary is through a series of virtual tours and live web cams. The Monterey Bay Aquarium features a live cam from within its kelp forest exhibit as well as one from its observation deck. Educational opportunities also abound as classes, tours and exhibitions are featured year round through a variety of local, regional and national agencies and organizations.

So experience one of the most important ocean areas in the world as you visit the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. It’s “fin-tastic”

Memories Are Made of This

Thursday, May 23rd, 2013
Facebook Twitter Email Pinterest

With its breathtaking shores and beautiful foothills, the Monterey Peninsula has long been known as one of the country’s foremost places for a destination wedding. Thousands of couples, their families and friends flock to Monterey and beyond to celebrate their nuptials and enjoy the wide-ranging choices in location, world class food and other activities. Everyone knows Pebble Beach of course,  and if you are Sean Parker, the founder of Napster and Facebook’s first president you can pretty much build your own venue in Big Sur. (Yes, he is actually doing that to the tune of $10 million!) A special perk, however, for those who make the Peninsula home is the “insider” knowledge about some of the most beautiful locations that fly way under the radar.

 

One of those hidden gems is the Memory Garden located at 20 Custom House Plaza in Monterey. The garden, located just outside the Portola Hotel & Spa, was designed by Fredrick Law Olmstead Jr. in 1927 and is enclosed by eight foot adobe walls which gives this venue a peaceful and private tranquility. The Garden is managed by the California State Parks and counts the Monterey State Historic Park office and the historic Pacific House Museum as part of the property. Featuring a 15-foot diameter fountain, a beautiful historic flower garden and a 5×16 foot barbeque, the garden has Southern Magnolia trees throughout the grounds that offer peaceful shade and lend to the park-like quality of the venue. The grounds also include a small dressing room and bathroom, but with its proximity to the Portola Hotel, wedding guests will often make their way directly from the hotel. The natural beauty of the garden juxtaposed with the historic adobe of California’s first state capital create a photographer’s dream and a location that can serve as wedding or reception location, or both!

The staff at the Portola Hotel can provide you with information on group rates for you and your guests and the folks at the State Parks can offer additional information on the Memory Garden itself. So if you are looking for something more intimate than Pebble Beach and don’t quite have the coin to build your own venue in Big Sur, consider the Memory Garden on Monterey’s Custom House Plaza. As the song goes, Memories are made of this!

Summer Festivals in Monterey

Friday, May 10th, 2013
Facebook Twitter Email Pinterest

As many know, the Monterey Peninsula is one of the most beautiful places on earth. From the rugged coastline of Big Sur and the serene inlets of Moss Landing’s Elkhorn Slough to the winding trails of Carmel Valley and the Fort Ord National Monument, there is something for everyone. While those attractions are available throughout the year, some of the Peninsula’s most popular attractions only come around every 365 days.

Monterey and the surrounding area have long been synonymous with music and art of many kinds and nothing exemplifies that better than the summer festivals that make Monterey their home. The granddaddy is the Monterey Jazz Festival September 20-23, 2013. The longest continuously running jazz festival in the world, the MJF has continued to hold its September dates since 1958 and has features some of the biggest names in Jazz and popular music. Not to be outdone is the Carmel Bach Festival which is celebrating its 76th year with 15 days of performances, talks and educational events July 13-27, 2013.

 

Monterey stamped itself on the counterculture scene with the Monterey Pop Festival in 1967, which was the blueprint for future musical spectacles like Woodstock and Lollapalooza and continues the tradition today, although with a slightly mellower vibe. The California Roots Music & Arts festival gets the summer started right, Memorial Day Weekend May 24-26, 2013. The good times continue August 9-11, 2013 with the Monterey Bay Reggaefest. In its 18th year, the festival is one of the largest in Northern California and features over 20 performers.

The ear has been satisfied, but how about the mouth? The food festival season kicks off with Cooking for Solutions at the Monterey Bay Aquarium. The three day event, May 17-19, 2013, focuses on sustainability and environmental stewardship in the food and beverage industry.  Also that weekend is the 54th annual Castroville Artichoke Festival. Celebrate California’s newly crowned State Vegetable and soak in a bit of history as the Festival counts a young Marilyn Monroe as one of their first “Artichoke Queens.” Memorial Day weekend features the Great Monterey Clam Chowder & Calamari Festival as two of the peninsula’s favorite seafood dishes collide at Custom House Plaza behind the Portola Hotel & Spa. If you are a wine lover, the area also plays host to the Monterey Wine Festival, June 7-8, 2013 and the Winemaker’s Celebration on August 10, 2013.  Both showcase the best of Monterey County’s vast winemaking region which was recently named one of the “Top 10 Wine Travel Destinations” by Wine Enthusiast Magazine.

Ear; check. Mouth; check, but what about your eyes? Monterey also hosts a number of summertime art festivals and while music and food are certainly considered art, these are the traditional forms are highlighted at events like the Carmel Art Festival May 16-19, 2013. With its origins as a bohemian artist colony, Carmel-By-The-Sea plays host as the 20th annual event that showcases visual arts, sculpture, a judged plein air painting competition and much more. Three weeks later, the Valley gets into the act with the Carmel Valley Art & Wine Festival June 8, 2013. Carmel Valley Village comes alive as over 60 artists and art galleries display their works. Sand City, Monterey County’s hotbed of alternative art and vision hosts the Sand City West End Celebration August 23-25, 2013. Known for its independent and irreverent artistic atmosphere, the West End Celebration features and open air artist’s fair throughout the streets and the public is invited into the many studios and creative spaces that call Sand City home.

So if the dog days of summer are getting you down or you need to break for the coast to beat the heat, cruise into Monterey County and enjoy the eclectically rich summer festival scene. There truly is something for everyone!

How to Pack For A Monterey Vacation

Thursday, April 18th, 2013
Facebook Twitter Email Pinterest

Visiting the Monterey Peninsula is one of the country’s great vacations. Whether you are on a weekender from the Bay Area, a mid-week business trip from the East Coast or are traveling internationally and spending a couple of weeks, the wide ranging beauty and landscape of the area make each day a unique adventure. It also, however, makes packing for the Monterey Peninsula somewhat of a challenge.

American author Mark Twain once wrote, “The coldest winter I ever experienced, was the summer I spent in San Francisco.” San Francisco’s location usually means a foggy day on their peninsula and warm sunny one slightly inland and the Monterey Peninsula is no different. In Pebble Beach it could be foggy and windy while in Monterey the conditions could be and sunny and mild. Meanwhile, as you move into Carmel Valley, you could experience clear skies and temperatures in the 80’s!

With so many microclimates within a few miles of each other, what’s a visitor to do? Layers are the key, but more than layers, are multi-functional pieces that can keep you warm on an early morning walk along the Monterey Bay Coastal Recreation Trail, dining al fresco at Jacks Restaurant & Lounge or Peter B’s Brewpub at the Portola Hotel & Spa, but then can easily fit in a backpack as you explore the Monterey Bay Aquarium. A light wind & water resistant jacket is a must, as are a couple of sweater options. Shorts and comfortable pants are also important as visitors often will spend time walking and sightseeing. A good pair of trail sneakers/shoes will be a savior for your feet whether you are hiking at Garland Ranch in Carmel Valley or strolling through Pacific Grove’s historic downtown. Don’t forget to bring a swimsuit. While the water can be chilly, the beaches of the Monterey Peninsula are fantastic and there are many spa options that offer Jacuzzis, saunas and more. Finally, don’t forget to bring something nice to wear. With a fantastic array of nationally recognized restaurants, art galleries and cultural events you’ll want to have the option of dressing up to enjoy your experience.

The Monterey Peninsula has something for everyone and with the some thoughtful packing, visitors can enjoy it all with ease!